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 Scripting Language Suggestions?

I want a portable scripting language that interfaces with C++ and will
make it easy to directly manipulate C++ objects.  The user of the
scripting language should be able to create, destroy, set and query
attributes, and call operations on the objects in my C++ application.
Failing that, I'm willing to abandon C++ altogether if there is an
alternative language that meets the following requirements
better than the combination of C++ and a bolted-on scripting language:

reasonably portable to different platforms (Unix platforms, at a minimum)
Object Oriented (inheritance, polymorphism, encapsulation)
easy interactive manipulation of objects (scripting, etc.)
allows some way to implement a fast inner loop (if this is through
      calling compiled code in another language, that's OK)
allows interfacing to other compiled C libraries
usable in a GPL'ed application

My development platform is Linux and G++.
Thanks for any suggestions you may have.

-Rob
--
Robert W. Brewer  
rbre...@op.net    



 Thu, 22 Jul 1999 03:00:00 GMT   
 Scripting Language Suggestions?

take a look at perl.



 Thu, 22 Jul 1999 03:00:00 GMT   
 Scripting Language Suggestions?

<< I need a scripting languge. (Full text below) >>

Perl.  It meets all of your needs and is distributed under a liscense similar
to the GPL.  It will run on almost any platform, and can call other languages.
                                                         --Brad

__________________________________________________________
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 brad...@conan.ids.net     Finger for PGP key.



 Thu, 22 Jul 1999 03:00:00 GMT   
 Scripting Language Suggestions?

You might take a look at Python at http://www.python.org



 Thu, 22 Jul 1999 03:00:00 GMT   
 Scripting Language Suggestions?

Robert W. Brewer (rbre...@wiz.rob.net) wrote:
: [looking for a scripting language...]

I like Tcl. See http://www.sunlabs.com/research/tcl/, http://www.tcltk.com/,
http://www.sco.com/Technology/tcl/, or http://www.neosoft.com/tcl/.
Reasonable people disagree, one compendium
of Usenet discussion is at http://icemcfd.com/tcl/comparison.html.

: reasonably portable to different platforms (Unix platforms, at a minimum)

Sun officially supports Tcl on the Big Three: Unix, Windows, and the Mac.
Other ports exist as well.

: Object Oriented (inheritance, polymorphism, encapsulation)

Look at [incr tcl].

: easy interactive manipulation of objects (scripting, etc.)

Tcl is very interactive, and provides a good shell for online experimentation.
It won't replace tcsh as my default shell, but almost.

: allows some way to implement a fast inner loop (if this is through
:       calling compiled code in another language, that's OK)
: allows interfacing to other compiled C libraries

Tcl is easy to extend. From the beginning it was intended to interoperate
with native code.

: usable in a GPL'ed application

The Tcl core and most extensions use BSD style licensing.

--
Douglas Ridgway
Department of Physics and Institute for Nonlinear Science
University of California, San Diego
http://inls.ucsd.edu/~ridgway/



 Fri, 23 Jul 1999 03:00:00 GMT   
 Scripting Language Suggestions?

I don't believe there is anything that makes direct manipulation
of C++ objects as easy as you would like to.

This sounds good. If you are in the beginning of your project, which
does not have very complexly controlled "heavy duty" computations, the
best choise (in my opinion) is Python. I have been using TCL/C/C++ at work,
but just ported my hobby project from TCL/G++ to Python/Tk/G++ and I
feel that Python is a more efficient tool than TCL. Python has a number
of numerical extensions written in C, which might fit your needs. If not,
you can still extend it with a small amount of wrapper code (somewhat
more coding than with TCL, but again more efficient).

See: http://www.python.org

--Jyrki Alakuijala



 Fri, 23 Jul 1999 03:00:00 GMT   
 Scripting Language Suggestions?

This is incorrect.  The BSD license contains restrictions on advertising
and requirements for documentation that the Tcl license does not contain.
Some lawyers who have looked at the question (according to Alan Cox, who
did much of Linux's networking implementation) say that the BSD license
and the GPL conflict (meaning that you can't combine BSD and GPL code in
the same program).

This is not true of Tcl's license.  Tcl (and much Berkeley CAD software)
uses a license that those of us who did free software at Berkeley called
"the Osterhout license".  The only requirement imposed is that a
copyright notice and disclaimer of warranty be included in all copies
of the software.
--
-- Joe Buck     http://www.synopsys.com/pubs/research/people/jbuck.html

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 Fri, 23 Jul 1999 03:00:00 GMT   
 Scripting Language Suggestions?

...........

Hmm.. then why do I see BSD copyright and disclaimers in sources for
many of GPL'ed utilities that come with a standard Linux distribution?
Very often in the same program!
...................

...and please, dear Corporate Monopoly(tm), feel free to take the source
and make it proprietary by releasing only binaries without modified
source code. No, thanks.

--
When sending private email, please remove underscores in "vladi_mip".
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 Fri, 23 Jul 1999 03:00:00 GMT   
 Scripting Language Suggestions?

Which may itself conflict with the GPL.  The GPL mandates (in section
2) that any software under the GPL can be modified in whatever way
desired so long as it satisfies 2(a), 2(b), and 2(c).  The Ousterhout
license prohibits such modification of the copyright and warranty
notices, so seems to me to fall into section 7, prohibiting
distribution of hybrid Ousterhout/GPL code.  If you can seperate the
GPL'd and Ousterhout'd portions of code you could distribute them
together under their respective; alternatively, you could distribute
GPL'd modifications to Ousterhout'd code.  The simplest course of
action in many circumstances might be to seek a GPL section 10 waiver
and distribute the whole thing under Ousterhout.

The above is not legal advice.

Cordially,

  Sumner

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 Fri, 23 Jul 1999 03:00:00 GMT   
 Scripting Language Suggestions?

In comp.os.linux.development.apps Robert W. Brewer <rbre...@wiz.rob.net> wrote:

There are actually quite a few of these available right now, but none
of them interact very well with C++ (because the object model sucks
so badly for dynamic scipting, IMHO).

The more popular ones are:

Guile - Under active development by the FSF and volunteers, it's a
scripting language based upon the Scheme programming language with
some nice modifications.  Right now, it's still a little bit beta-is,
but I believe will be one of the more widely supported within a few
years.  Apparently the object model isn't very advanced at this time,
but eventually a STklos object system (complete with Meta Object
Protocol) should be available.

Perl - I believe the best parts of Perl are the builtin string
processing utilities, and it's ease of usefor quickly building small
UNIXish utilities and network scripts.  However, I don't like the
Perl syntax, and can't say I'd recommend it as a glue language for
any very large project that wasn't mostly based upon text.  Version
5 supports a reasonable object system and is much easier to link
code into.

Tcl/Tk - Tk is a very nice GUI, and has subsequently been incorporated
into Guile/Python/Perl/STk.  Tcl is a string interpreter with a really
nice interface to C.  Basically you wrap all your C functionality
in Tcl and glue it together in scripts.  However, string interpreting
tends to be slow, so anything computationally expensive should
be pushed out into the C code.  Tcl/Tk was also one of the first
scripting languages to be widely available, so it has a large
user base and is fairly stable.

STk - Tcl/Tk with Tcl replaced by a scheme engine.

Python - A byte-code interpreted language with a clean interface to
C, bunches of libraries, a nice dynamic object system.

SLang - a very small interpreter of a C-like language.  Don't know
much about this one.

Anyway, I recommend you look briefly at all of these and decide which
one suits your tastes the best.

  Michael



 Sat, 24 Jul 1999 03:00:00 GMT   
 Scripting Language Suggestions?

What ever language you choose (my vote would go to Python), take a
look at SWIG. This is a tool which reads Interface Definition Files
(descriptions of C-functions) and emits the code which allows to call
these functions from your favourite scripting language. Currently
supported are Perl, Python and TCL. There are only beginnings of
support for C++ classes though.

Daniel Dittmar (mailto:ditt...@berlin.snafu.de)



 Sat, 24 Jul 1999 03:00:00 GMT   
 Scripting Language Suggestions?

    Daniel> What ever language you choose (my vote would go to
    Daniel> Python), take a look at SWIG. This is a tool which reads
    Daniel> Interface Definition Files (descriptions of C-functions)
    Daniel> and emits the code which allows to call these functions
    Daniel> from your favourite scripting language. Currently
    Daniel> supported are Perl, Python and TCL. There are only
    Daniel> beginnings of support for C++ classes though.

Right, SWIG supports C++ with shadow classes in Python (no templates
though).  There is quite a bit of work going on in the Python
community on this (there's a paper by a Livermore group on C++ and
Python I could find if you're interested.  For an examples
look in:

http://www.cs.utah.edu/~beazley/SWIG/papers/sc96/INDEX.HTM

and I think (perhaps 1995 conference too:)

http://www.python.org/workshops/1996-06/papers/

and for Numerical Python:

http://maigret.cog.brown.edu/Python/Extensions/Numeric



 Sat, 24 Jul 1999 03:00:00 GMT   
 Scripting Language Suggestions?

Actually, SWIG can do this, for both Python and perl.  You can access
data members or member functions directly from the scripting language,
and SWIG generates all the wrappers for you given the prototypes for
your C++ functions.  It's really quite easy to use and I have had few
problems with it on linux.

You can get it from

      ftp://ftp.cs.utah.edu/pub/beazley/SWIG/

--
Gary Holt                       (818)-395-2882
h...@klab.caltech.edu                http://www.klab.caltech.edu/~holt/



 Sat, 24 Jul 1999 03:00:00 GMT   
 
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