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Author Message
 setenv, unix directory structure
1.
From the command prompt( csh) when I give "setenv", it displays all
the environment variables.

2.
"which ls" prints "/usr/bin/ls".

But
"which setenv" says
"no setenv in /usr/bin /usr/ucb /usr/sbin .............."

a) setenv worked in the case 1. But, when I asked for which setenv ,
it is not working.  Why ?  "Which" searches in $PATH. Is it correct ?
b) I found that "setenv" actually is in /usr/oasys/bin. This path is
not in the $PATH. Then , how case 1. worked ?

Also  , can anybody explain about the directory structure in a UNIX
machine( what will be there under /bin, /usr/bin/ , usr/ucb/bin etc).
Is the directory structure machine dependent ?

What about "/usr/oasys" directory ? What does oasys mean ?

I hope somebody will shed light on my questions.

I'm working with Solaris.



 Mon, 10 May 2004 14:29:40 GMT   
 setenv, unix directory structure

news:db9bbf31.0111212229.77d18bf3@posting.google.com...

setenv is a shell built-in.  There *is* no executable.

/usr/oasys.  Ah... you've got Green Hills C installed on your system.
/usr/oasys is the cross-assembler that they use.



 Mon, 10 May 2004 16:01:19 GMT   
 setenv, unix directory structure

setenv is the shell's internal command. It is interpreted by csh
itself internaly, as opposed to ls (which is as external program run
by csh).

Ilja.



 Mon, 10 May 2004 20:02:06 GMT   
 setenv, unix directory structure
In comp.unix.solaris qazmlp <qazmlp1...@rediffmail.com> wrote:

It usually depends on the flavour of Unix. For Solaris, try
"man filesystem".

From the above man page:

     /usr/oasys
           Commands and  files  related  to  the  Form  and  Menu
           Language Interpreter (FMLI) execution environment. See
           face(1).

hth, mp.
--
                         Martin Paul | Systems Administrator
      Institute for Software Science | mar...@par.univie.ac.at
Liechtensteinstrasse 22, A-1090 Wien | Tel: 01 4277 38803
        http://www.par.univie.ac.at/ | Fax: 01 4277 9388



 Mon, 10 May 2004 21:54:12 GMT   
 setenv, unix directory structure
If it is a shell build in, it should be visable when typing:

# type setenv

But that is not the case. Like "echo", is also a shell built-in, can't be
seen by "which" but CAN be seen with "type". But this is not the case for
"setenv", so I believe something more is going on here.
It is also not an alias so I checked, so it is a very interesting
question...

news:jh2L7.195$i46.89856054@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...



 Tue, 11 May 2004 00:44:23 GMT   
 setenv, unix directory structure

I don't believe csh has 'type'. At least, when I try it, it says
"type: Command not found.". So I'm guessing you're trying this in some
sh like shell. However, they don't have setenv.

Joe
--
Remember Flight 93



 Tue, 11 May 2004 01:17:06 GMT   
 setenv, unix directory structure

setenv in the C shell is a shell builtin.  Looks like csh doesn't like
reporting some of its own builtins.  We all love C shell.

Because that's a completely different setenv which has nothing at all to
do with the csh builtin setenv.  Forget it exists.

It's an old throwback to the AT&T heritage of Solaris.  Vmsys and oasys
were a menuing system called FACE (Framed Access Command Environment) -
"VM" stood for ViewMaster until the makers of the Viewmaster 3D picture
viewer pointed out that AT&T were infringing on their trademark. I
forget exactly what OA stood for in "oasys". The system allowed you (and
still does - it's all there as far as I know) to set up windowing-style
menus on an ASCII terminal.  I'm not sure that anything uses it any
more.

--
Tony



 Mon, 10 May 2004 18:15:47 GMT   
 setenv, unix directory structure
In article <3BFCD053.76E8...@uk.sun.com>,
Tony Walton  <tony.wal...@uk.sun.com> wrote:
[ ... ]

And has been a potent source of security bugs in the past (more so when
more files were owned by "bin"). It's a good idea just to "pkgrm SUNWfac".

Chris Thompson
Email: cet1 [at] cam.ac.uk



 Tue, 11 May 2004 05:39:43 GMT   
 setenv, unix directory structure

A built in command should also be listed in
man $SHELL



 Tue, 11 May 2004 08:19:35 GMT   
 setenv, unix directory structure
[[ PLEASE DON'T SEND ME EMAIL COPIES OF POSTINGS ]]

% which type
/bin/type

Confused, yet?

Casper
--
Expressed in this posting are my opinions.  They are in no way related
to opinions held by my employer, Sun Microsystems.
Statements on Sun products included here are not gospel and may
be fiction rather than truth.



 Tue, 11 May 2004 04:21:58 GMT   
 setenv, unix directory structure

Eh?

$ csh
foo% type type
type is a shell builtin

This is on Solaris (as is the OP, according to their posting)

--
Tony



 Tue, 11 May 2004 01:47:16 GMT   
 setenv, unix directory structure
"Casper H.S. Dik - Network Security Engineer" wrote:

Nope:
man which  (my capitals)

DESCRIPTION
     which takes a list of names and looks for  the  files  which
     would  be  executed  had these names been given as commands.
     Each argument is expanded if it is aliased, AND SEARCHED FOR
     ALONG  THE USER'S PATH. Both aliases and path are taken from
     the user's .cshrc file.

foo% which set
no set in /usr/dt/bin /usr/bin /usr/local/bin . /usr/local/share/sh
/usr/ccs/bin /opt/SUNWspro/bin /usr/dist/exe

foo% type set
set is a special builtin

"which" doesn't know about  shell builtins.

--
Tony



 Tue, 11 May 2004 17:24:33 GMT   
 setenv, unix directory structure
[[ PLEASE DON'T SEND ME EMAIL COPIES OF POSTINGS ]]

But that still doesn't make "type" one:

foo% type for case while do elif else if
for is a reserved shell keyword
case is a reserved shell keyword
while is a reserved shell keyword
do is a reserved shell keyword
elif is a reserved shell keyword
else is a reserved shell keyword
if is a reserved shell keyword

Still think "type" is a C-shell command?

My which actually does know about builtins and still says:

% which type
/bin/type
% which set
set: shell built-in command.
% which setenv
setenv: shell built-in command.
%

In C-shell, "type" *is* /bin/type

It's the same command as /bin/alias, /bin/cd and some others.

A completely bogus command that apparently exists to satisfy some
bogus standards conformance rule.

% /bin/type type
type is a shell builtin

Casper

--
Expressed in this posting are my opinions.  They are in no way related
to opinions held by my employer, Sun Microsystems.
Statements on Sun products included here are not gospel and may
be fiction rather than truth.



 Tue, 11 May 2004 18:09:26 GMT   
 setenv, unix directory structure

Interesting. On Linux (RH 7.1):

$ csh
$ type type
type: Command not found.

On HP-UX 10.20 and 11.0

$ csh
% type type
type is an exported alias for whence -v

On AIX 4.3.3

$ csh
% type type
type is an exported alias for whence -v

Our Solaris box does show the same result you got. Guess I should have
tried that one too :-)

Joe
--
Remember Flight 93



 Tue, 11 May 2004 22:08:44 GMT   
 setenv, unix directory structure
In article <3BFD3A24.D91...@uk.sun.com>,
Tony Walton  <tony.wal...@uk.sun.com> wrote:

That's because of the existence of /usr/bin/type (hardlinked as all
of alias, bg, cd, command, fc, fg, getopts, hash, jobs, kill, read,
test, type, ulimit, umask, unalias & wait) which is a ksh script.
So it's telling you that "type" is a builtin in ksh...

The history of this curious collection has been discussed on
comp.unix.solaris before.

BTW, in tcsh, unlike csh, "which" is a real builtin which will
recognise other builtins, like "type" in Real(TM) shells. If you
can't kick the csh habit, at least consider using tcsh.

Chris Thompson
Email: cet1 [at] cam.ac.uk



 Tue, 11 May 2004 23:05:37 GMT   
 
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