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 C SHELL PROGRAMMING BOOKS & MANUALS

i don't know if it's like the Sun manuals, but a good book on csh in
general is: _Unix C Shell Field Guide_, by Anderson & Anderson.

---
John Gordon                  "No Silicon Heaven?  Preposterous!  Where would
gor...@osiris.cso.uiuc.edu    all the calculators go?" -- Kryten, Red Dwarf



 Sun, 04 Feb 2001 03:00:00 GMT   
 C SHELL PROGRAMMING BOOKS & MANUALS
In article <6reo8h$e8...@vixen.cso.uiuc.edu>,
        gor...@osiris.cso.uiuc.edu (John Gordon) writes:

If you haven't started programming csh can I suggest that you read this
  http://www.**-**.com/
first. There are fundimental problems with csh. For portable scripts
use sh (there are differences between Solaris and SunOs).

For good looking and well written scripts try tcl
  http://www.**-**.com/
which is a general purpose script language (along with Guile, Scheme,
Perl and many others).

Duncan

--
________________________________________________________________________
Duncan Barclay          | God smiles upon the little children,
d...@ragnet.demon.co.uk | the {*filter*}ics, and the permanently stoned.
________________________________________________________________________



 Sun, 04 Feb 2001 03:00:00 GMT   
 C SHELL PROGRAMMING BOOKS & MANUALS

Absolutely!

Don't forget the korn shell.  It's a far more modern shell than the
bourne shell and has a lot of new useful programming constructs.
While some purists say "it's not portable", I usually find that it's
portable enough, as most modern systems have either the korn shell
itself or pdksh (or zsh, which is a kornshell superset and maybe
bash).

Then again, there's always the POSIX sh specs, which is a subset of
the korn shell, but I'm not sure how widely they're supported.
Anything with bash will do fine, FreeBSD's /bin/sh is POSIX and
solaris has a POSIX sh hidden away, so it works for me, I guess.
--
Dom Mitchell          -- Palmer & Harvey McLane
d...@phmit.demon.co.uk -- Unix Systems Administrator



 Mon, 05 Feb 2001 03:00:00 GMT   
 C SHELL PROGRAMMING BOOKS & MANUALS
In article <kgg1est645....@voodoo.pandhm.co.uk>,
  Dom Mitchell <d...@phmit.demon.co.uk> wrote:

As they say: It's easier porting a shell than porting a (`pure' Bourne)
shell script.

Perhaps a good reason to go for ksh (or bash) anyway...

Greetings,
Moritz.   :-)

--
All opinions expressed above are my own and not approved by my employer.



 Mon, 05 Feb 2001 03:00:00 GMT   
 C SHELL PROGRAMMING BOOKS & MANUALS
In article <6rhhcn$s8...@aken.eed.ericsson.se>,
        Moritz Barsnick <barsn...@gmx.net> writes:

Having seen the original source of S.R.Bourne's creation I would tend to
disagree. It was written when malloc wasn't invented but it has
dymanic memory allocation. There is a header file called mac.h with
things like #define LOOP for(;;){ in it (check your Algol manual).

Go for ksh or sh, don't go for bash as it ain't available everywhere.

Duncan

--
________________________________________________________________________
Duncan Barclay          | God smiles upon the little children,
d...@ragnet.demon.co.uk | the {*filter*}ics, and the permanently stoned.
________________________________________________________________________



 Mon, 05 Feb 2001 03:00:00 GMT   
 C SHELL PROGRAMMING BOOKS & MANUALS
The unscrupulous can exploit .kshrc and/or aliases to
get a ksh script to do unintended things.  Use the
Bourne shell.  The advantages of ksh over sh are
mostly at the command line, viz. command history
and command editing.

--
Paul Beardsell



 Tue, 06 Feb 2001 03:00:00 GMT   
 C SHELL PROGRAMMING BOOKS & MANUALS

I disagree with that.  Bash is more likely to be available than ksh,
as it comes with source.  Ksh is nice, but alot of places don't have,
or don't have a modern version of it.
--
Dom Mitchell          -- Palmer & Harvey McLane
d...@phmit.demon.co.uk -- Unix Systems Administrator



 Tue, 06 Feb 2001 03:00:00 GMT   
 C SHELL PROGRAMMING BOOKS & MANUALS
I should have said, of course, "Use the Bourne shell FOR WRITING
SCRIPTS."

In article <I3$asDAUMS31E...@beardsell.demon.co.uk>, Paul Beardsell
<p...@beardsell.demon.co.uk> writes

--
Paul Beardsell



 Tue, 06 Feb 2001 03:00:00 GMT   
 C SHELL PROGRAMMING BOOKS & MANUALS

That last statement is false.  The advantages of the Korn shell for
progarmming scripts are numerous.  To begin with, you have arrays
(associative arrays in ksh93).  You also have proper arithmetic
handing (no more `expr`).  Have a look at http://www.kornshell.com/
for more details.  Because of the increased number of builtins, you
will often find that a script that is written to use Korn shell
capabilities will execute faster than the equivalent Bourne shell
script.

In regards to security, I do think that the Korn shells ENV variable
is a large misfeature.  However, the Bourne shell has it's own history
of holes.  Korn shell scripts can be made to avoid using ENV, though,
like this:

#!/bin/ksh -p --
--
Dom Mitchell          -- Palmer & Harvey McLane
d...@phmit.demon.co.uk -- Unix Systems Administrator



 Tue, 06 Feb 2001 03:00:00 GMT   
 C SHELL PROGRAMMING BOOKS & MANUALS

What the???  Bash isn't available everywhere??  It has been ported to
every Unix I've heard of,  as well as MS Windows/Dos.  Perhaps this
is a definition of "everywhere" that I haven't heard yet.

--B. Chas Parisher



 Tue, 06 Feb 2001 03:00:00 GMT   
 C SHELL PROGRAMMING BOOKS & MANUALS
B. Chas Parisher (b...@netcom.com) wrote:
: Duncan Barclay <d...@ragnet.demon.co.uk> wrote:
: >Go for ksh or sh, don't go for bash as it ain't available everywhere.
:
: What the???  Bash isn't available everywhere??  It has been ported to
: every Unix I've heard of,  as well as MS Windows/Dos.  Perhaps this
: is a definition of "everywhere" that I haven't heard yet.
:
"Everywhere" is IT departments who's manager won't add software
to the original distribution.

There is a public domain version of ksh, known kornily [sic] enough as
pdksh.  Are you supposed to post to a unix.wizards group if you don't
know these things. :)



 Tue, 06 Feb 2001 03:00:00 GMT   
 C SHELL PROGRAMMING BOOKS & MANUALS

Unless he/she/it put zsh in there first...   :-)
--
Dom Mitchell          -- Palmer & Harvey McLane
d...@phmit.demon.co.uk -- Unix Systems Administrator



 Wed, 07 Feb 2001 03:00:00 GMT   
 C SHELL PROGRAMMING BOOKS & MANUALS
On Fri, 21 Aug 1998 18:11:42 GMT, B. Chas Parisher

You won't find it on a vanilla Solaris box. Or a vanilla SCO OpenServer
box. Or others released by corporations who prize strict adherence to
standards documentation above practical usability.

You can almost invariably get it as an installable package (remember,
I'm talking about UNIXen that probably don't come with a bundled C
compiler, either, for licensing reasons), but that's not much use when
you're dealing with a luser customer site.

-- Charlie



 Thu, 08 Feb 2001 03:00:00 GMT   
 C SHELL PROGRAMMING BOOKS & MANUALS
On 22 Aug 1998 09:18:14 GMT, Hugh Davies

Quite right: there are {*filter*}wits everywhere.

(You didn't need me to tell you this, did you?)

-- Charlie



 Thu, 08 Feb 2001 03:00:00 GMT   
 C SHELL PROGRAMMING BOOKS & MANUALS
In comp.unix.programmer B. Chas Parisher <b...@netcom.com> wrote:

I think this "everywhere" means that the bash isn't  in basic installation
of some Unix, e.g. SunOS or Hp-UX. And you must download it.
                                                                                                        Mirec



 Fri, 09 Feb 2001 03:00:00 GMT   
 
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